Daily Dose I – This Weekend in Boise w/ New Instructor, Jessie Hensley, MS, RD

Anyone taking either the Amma Bodywork Therapy Program or the Wholistic Nutrition Program (WNP) is familiar with Daily Dose classes. Where else can you learn about uses, sources, safety, etc., for vitamins and minerals alongside French Green Clay, Castor Oil Packs and Nettle Tea? This is definitely a unique class packed full of ever evolving information relevant to the holistic healthcare practitioner, nutrition professional or anyone interested in learning more about healthy living. It’s a little different every time and definitely worth repeating!

We are very excited to be offering Daily Dose I this weekend, August 6th & 7th, 9:00-5:30 both days, with one of our new WNP instructors, Jessie Hensley, MS, RD. To give you a feel for Jessie and her approach to nutrition and the upcoming class in particular, we’ve included a recent Q&A with her from our Summer Newsletter. Check it out and if you are interested in taking the class, call the school office to register at 208.388.0206. There are still a couple of spots available. The price of the workshop is $275, but for alumni re-taking it again it’s 50% off!

 

More about Jessie!

Jessie Hensley, a Wellspring Wholistic Nutrition Program Instructor, is dedicated to helping others by exposing them to wholistic health knowledge. She earned her Masters of Science in Nutrition at Bastyr University. Following graduation, she interned at hospitals and became a Registered Dietitian. Currently, Jessie consults with nutrition clients, writes nutrition-related articles, and teaches health topics for Art Institute of Seattle, University of Phoenix, and the YMCA. Jessie will be teaching Daily Dose I in Boise August 6th & 7th.

Q: When did you know this was the path your life would take?
A: I had become increasingly interested in nutrition after years of eating poorly and not feeling very good in my adult life. When it finally became apparent to me that nutrition was such a basic foundation of health, I decided to go to graduate school to study it.

Q: Where are you presently practicing?
A: I am starting my own practice in Seattle this summer, but it doesn’t have a name yet! I’d love to hear some suggestions! I am thinking of something along the lines of “real solutions for regular people.”

Q: How do you challenge yourself to keep up with new knowledge in the field?
A: That is always a challenge, especially in the nutrition field, in which opinions are constantly changing, the media picks and chooses the issues, and new scientific discoveries are constantly being made. To keep up, I read a lot, but I stay grounded by remembering the principles behind traditional nutrition, which don’t really change.

Q: What’s the biggest impact your practice has had on your life?
A: Practicing nutrition has resulted in better health for myself and those I’ve shared my knowledge with.

Q: How did you begin teaching?
A: My first teaching experience was in Japan, teaching conversational English to children and adults. After that, I volunteered as a community nutrition educator during grad school, which was a lot of fun. I also volunteered as a teacher in Ghana. Since then I’ve been teaching undergraduates.

Q: What’s your educational background?
A: My MS in Nutrition was earned from Bastyr University. Upon graduating, I went through a 9-month dietetic internship, to become a Registered Dietitian. During the internship, I worked at hospitals, long-term care facilities, school districts, and community nutrition programs. My BA is in Liberal Arts & Sciences, from Virginia Tech, with concentrations in biology, chemistry, history and journalism.

Q: How does teaching affect your practice and inner life?
A: There’s a saying that you haven’t really learned a subject until you’ve taught it. I think this is very true. I feel that, by teaching nutrition, I can better explain it to my clients. It makes me confident that I know it, inside and out.

Q: How did your life before becoming a teacher prepare to take on the role of teacher?
A: I used to be a pretty shy person, and would never have imagined myself standing in front of a class by choice. I think writing, first for my college newspaper, and then as a freelance writer, helped to bring me out of my shell, as well as giving me experience in clearly communicating ideas to an audience. Moving around a lot and traveling have also helped me become a more social and outgoing person. Both of my parents were teachers at some point, as well, so maybe it’s in the genes.

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